Close Quarters Weapon Retention

Simulating a close quarters situation for practice can be difficult. There are many factors that aren’t present in traditional shooting when engaging a threat up close. Shooting accurately can be challenging enough on a range; when you introduce someone grabbing for your weapon, it becomes more dangerous and difficult. This is because you are now trying to focus on many things at once instead of just getting rounds on target.

Weapon retention is arguably the most important factor in a close quarters fight. Losing control of your weapon is a worst case scenario because it limits your ability to defend yourself and adds the potential of your own weapon being used against you.

Read the rest of the article: https://nextleveltraining.com/cqweaponretention/

How to Shoot a Pistol? – Discover Everything You Need for Next Level Shooting

Pistols are uniquely American. Few countries in the world allow their citizens to own guns. Americans can not only own guns, they can own pistols. That is very rare on the planet and you should be taking advantage of this.

Learning to use a pistol like a carpenter uses a hammer, takes time, skill and expertise. If you’re completely new consider training. If you’ve been to the range a time or two, and you’d like to channel your inner John Wayne and sling lead from your sidearm, you’re in luck.​

This is the start of your pistol education for people who’ll be carrying a pistol for protection from predators, both 2 legged and 4 legged, and people wanting to get a start in handgun hunting.​

Read the rest of the article: https://stayhunting.com/how-to-shoot-a-pistol/

Reticle Perpendicularity

Long range shooters go through great pains to properly set-up their rifles for long range shooting. Bipods, muzzle brakes, cosine indicators and a host of other widgets often adorn their newly created thunder stick. How many of them actually check to see that their scope reticle is perpendicular to the bore?

Often times they take for granted that the store clerk/gunsmith properly installed the scope and it is true to the rifle’s bore? Others often cant the rifle and set the reticle to what “looks vertical” in their opinion? The resulting misalignment can cause problems when we engage targets at long range.

Over the years I’ve watched shooters adjust both elevation and windage in apparent dead calm conditions. When queried about the “extra windage” they dialed, the excuses ranged from rotational drift, to the Coriolis effect? Never once did they question the possibility that the reticle was not perpendicular to the bore. Rotational drift at 500 yards is minimal (approx. 1.5 inches depending upon caliber and bullet) and is of no real concern to the long range hunter. Can you judge point of impact that accurately under field conditions? Probably not?

Read the rest of the article: http://www.longrangehunting.com/articles/reticle-perpendicularity.php