Are Silenced Weapons Really That Quiet as Shown in the Movies?

Are Silenced Weapons Really That Quiet as Shown in the Movies?

Have you ever wondered about how people handle guns in the moves?

They make it look so easily!

Whether they are professional or act as if it were their first time shooting a gun, they seem to have no trouble with it except for a bit of shakiness (but this is all acting). But just like how they act, most of what you see on the television isn’t real. And one of the wrongly-perceived facts when using guns in the movies? How loud they sound!
Yes, what you hear and how people act when shooting a gun in the movies is NOT what you would expect in real life. But what is it supposed to sound like anyway?
Read on as I show you the facts about the gun’s sounds and the wrong perception between gun silencers and suppressors.

How Loud Are Guns?
So, let’s figure out where the gun sounds come from. The primary source comes from the sonic crack of the bullet, then the mechanical action and the sound of your bullet hitting your target.
Even the should as your bullet flies off the gun makes a sound! So with all these in mind, it isn’t exactly the silent sound you have heard in movies, nor is it just a crack. If used without protection or a suppressor, you may actually suffer from permanent ear damage because of it!
That is why people invest on silencers or suppressors, which reduces the noise to up to 43 decibels, which depends on factors such as the type of bullet and length of your gun’s barrel or silencer itself. On average, it would suppress about 30 decibels

Is It a Silencer or Suppressor? What People Get Wrong
No, it DEFINITELY isn’t a silencer! A silencer would make the sound of a gun fully quiet and simply just a “whoosh” sound, which you hear in movies. But silencers do not do that. In fact, they aren’t really called silencers, but are supposed to be known as its real name, which are suppressors.
They do not make the gun anywhere near silent, but suppress the noise because of the pressure wave from the propellant gases, which expands rapidly. So it only reduces a portion of what makes the gunshot defining.

Using a gun silencer is crucial because it would reduce the recoil to up to 30%, which would increase your accuracy and reduce your fatigue from miring. It also helps with its precision and your ear safety. You wouldn’t want permanent ear damage, and a suppressor, though still loud when used, will greatly reduce the risk.

How to Keep Your Ears Safe When Firing a Gun
So now that you know about the real sound of the gun and what to expect, what are the precautions you should make to prevent any injuries and perform well when using your gun?

It all boils down to the proper usage of guns, which takes practice and skill. You can never change the gun’s sound, despite having a suppressor. And since you can’t change that, what you can do is to adjust and get used to how it sounds.

But of course, while you are using it (unless it’s an unexpected emergency), ensure that you have the earplugs and protection to avoid affecting your ears. And as much as possible, invest in a suppressor because believe me, it isn’t just a “whoosh” sound you expect!

In Conclusion
When using a gun, there are things you must take note of. While you think that using a gun for the first time isn’t all that bad, it will take practice and skill to get used to handling it, especially when it comes to the sound! But as long as you have the proper protection for your gun and continue to practice with a suppressor, gaining knowledge on the gun, then you won’t need to worry about any injuries you may sustain while using the gun.

I hope that this article helped you become fully informed on the gun’s loudness levels and the importance of suppressors (they are not silencers!). So now that you’re acquainted with this area of the gun, do read more articles and learn more about its parts and function to further learn about how it works and how to use it.

If you have any questions or would like to share your tips and experiences on handling a gun and its sound, then comment down below. I would love to hear what you have to think.


Author Bio:Hi, my name is Naser, a gun enthusiast who’s always on the lookout for new and exciting weapons to use and gun accessories to improve my skills. As someone who’s had experience with handling a gun since I was a teen, I have the expertise and skills to share with you my ideas and tips on how to handle a gun properly and with style. So come join me as I share my passion!

ASA Commends Inclusion Of Hearing Protection Act Language In Comprehensive Sportsmen’S Package

On September 1, Rep. Jeff Duncan (R-SC-3) and Rep. Gene Green (D-TX-29), the bipartisan leadership of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus, introduced H.R. 3668. Known as the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act, or SHARE Act, the bill includes 19 pro-sportsmen’s provisions, including Title XV, a strengthened version of the Hearing Protection Act. The bill is currently scheduled for a hearing in the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Federal Lands at 10:00 AM on Tuesday, September 12.

Since the re-introduction of the Hearing Protection Act by Rep. Duncan and Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) in January (H.R. 367S. 59), the American Suppressor Association (ASA) met with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) on multiple occasions to discuss technical amendments to the language. As a result, we were able to create several technical amendments that were incorporated into the current draft of the SHARE Act. These include:

  • Sec. 1502: Removing suppressors from the National Firearms Act, subjecting them to the same instant NICS background check as long guns, and issuing a refundable tax credit to anyone who has purchased a suppressor since the HPA’s original date of introduction
  • Sec. 1503: Ensuring that suppressors will remain legal in all 42 states where they are currently legal, after suppressors are removed from the National Firearms Act
  • Sec. 1504: Preempting states from levying taxes or registration requirements on suppressors. However, this will not make suppressors legal in any state where state law currently prohibits them.
  • Sec. 1505: Granting the ATF 365 days to destroy all suppressor related records from the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record (NFRTR)
  • Sec. 1506: Developing a “keystone part” definition, and requiring that such keystone part is serialized on every suppressor. This will ensure that individual suppressor parts, like pistons and endcaps, will not require serialization.
  • Sec. 1507: Imposing a 10% Pittman-Robertson excise tax on the manufacture of each new suppressor, a tax that is currently imposed on all Title I firearms

“The inclusion of the Hearing Protection Act in the sportsmen’s package highlights the commitment of the Sportsmen’s Caucus to make the hunting and recreational shooting experiences safer and more enjoyable for all,” said Knox Williams, President and Executive Director of the American Suppressor Association. “We know for a fact that exposure to noise from recreational firearms is one of the leading causes of hearing loss, which is why the CDC, NIOSH, and the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) have all recommended using suppressors as a tool to mitigate the danger. We look forward to working with the Sportsmen’s Caucus to make this legislation a reality.”

Suppressors have been federally regulated since the passage of the National Firearms Act of 1934. Currently, prospective buyers must live in one of the 42 states where they are legal, must send in an application including fingerprints and passport photos to the ATF, pay a $200 transfer tax, and wait for an indeterminate amount of time for the ATF to process the application. As of September, 2017, wait times are in excess of 10 months. In stark contrast, many countries in Europe place no regulations on their purchase, possession, or use. This legislation will remove suppressors from the onerous requirements of the NFA, and instead require purchasers to pass an instant NICS check, the same background check that is used during the sale of long guns. In doing so, law-abiding citizens will remain free to purchase suppressors, while prohibited persons will continue to be barred from purchasing or possessing these accessories.

To voice your support for the Hearing Protection Act and the SHARE Act, visit http://www.HearingProtectionAct.com.

ABOUT THE AMERICAN SUPPRESSOR ASSOCIATION 

The American Suppressor Association (ASA) is the unified voice of the suppressor industry. Our mission is to unite and advocate for the common interests of the suppressor community. To accomplish our mission, our principal initiatives focus on state lobbying, federal lobbying, public education, and industry outreach.

Source:
http://americansuppressorassociation.com/asa-commends-inclusion-of-hearing-protection-act-language-in-comprehensive-sportsmens-package/

Bill Advanced To Ease Suppressor Purchases

Suppressors get more than their fair share of negative attention, thanks in no small part to their association with Hollywood blockbuster snipers. They are much more than the cliche go-to of the cinematic assassin, though, and the GOP has taken up the defense of suppressors as one of its more quiet ambitions.

The Hearing Protection Act seeks to remove suppressors from the National Firearms Act. The current regulations require the purchase of a $200 tax stamp along with a complex application process. Even those qualified to own suppressors aren’t guaranteed that they can get approved in some locations. The Hearing Protection Act seeks to change that.

The House Committee on Natural Resources is set to hold a hearing tomorrow and the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreation Enhancement Act is on the agenda. This new measure includes almost all of the meat of the Hearing Protection Act.

Read the rest of the article: http://tribunist.com/politics/gop-pulls-legislative-maneuver-to-advance-bill-making-silencers-easier-to-purchase/