Magpul PMag D60

The PMAG D-60 is a durable, lightweight, highly reliable 60-round 5.56×45 NATO/.223 Remington polymer drum magazine for AR15/M4 compatible weapons.
With a larger capacity than previous PMAGs, the PMAG D-60 gives the shooter 60 rounds of ammunition, effectively allowing the same round count as two standard capacity 30-round magazines without requiring a critical reload.
The unique drum configuration keeps the height of the magazine manageable as well as allowing for prone firing and easier storage. Features an easy-to-use loading lever, paint pen dot matrix for easy marking, and a rear window for instant capacity indication. Compatible with a wide range of NATO firearms such as the M4, M16, SCAR™ MK16/16S, HK®416, MR556, M27 IAR, and others.

Made in U.S.A.


  • Next-generation impact and crush resistant polymer construction
  • Wide compatibility with most ‘STANAG 4179’ platforms such as the AR15, M4, M16, SCAR MK16/16S, HK416, MR556, M27 IAR, and others
  • Will seat fully loaded on a closed bolt
  • Bolt hold open feature to lock the bolt back on the last round*
  • Ratcheting Loading Lever to take tension off the spring for easy loading by hand
  • Feed Tower compatible with most loading devices, including USGI stripper clips and guides, the StripLULA™, and others
  • Designed to be left loaded for long term storage without any loss of function or degradation
  • All components used are corrosion resistant
  • Easy to disassemble for cleaning with only a flat-bladed screwdriver or similar
  • Anti-glare translucent window on rear of drum allows for easy determination of rounds remaining
  • Paint pen dot matrix panel on back of body to allow for identification marking
  • Slip-on, semi-rigid Dust Cover prevents grit and debris intrusion during storage and transport

Quick Draw Gun Holster Lubricant

I have had the opportunity to spend some time with the Gun Holster Lubricant manufactured by Quick Draw Gear. I have to say that this stuff does what it says it will do. I experienced no issues or problems when utilizing this product, and did notice a smoothness to holster draw that was not there before.

I am no scientist, so let me list a few items from the manufacturer’s page:

  • Quick Draw is a precise ratio of viscosity optimized silicone and lanolin. Just one spray creates a thin lubricating barrier between the holster and firearm that gives you an ultra-fast draw and protects the weapon. It speeds the draw by reducing friction and also protects your holster and firearm from abrasion, scuffing, corrosion and rust.
  • Developed and field tested by military and law enforcement, Quick Draw gives you the confidence of a fast draw each and every time you reach for your sidearm. No hanging, gripping, or friction to slow down your first shot time giving you the edge on the competition.
  • There are numerous kinds of silicone, each with viscosity ranging from thinner than water to thick grease. Quick Draw was perfected by testing a range of silicone types and viscosities to create the perfect lubricant for drawing a handgun from modern snug holsters. In combination with lanolin, Quick Draw creates a thin lubricating and protecting layer of silicone, while the lanolin penetrates to protect the gunmetal and holster.Typical silicone sprays found at home improvement stores contain tiny amounts of silicone with tons of fillers. Quick draw contains 20-30X more silicon than typical silicone spray lubricants.
  • Owned and operated by US Marine Corp and US ARMY Airborne veterans. Many of our friends continue with their careers in the military, working with private military contractors like Blackwater or law enforcement. We developed Quick Draw to give them every tactical advantage possible in their harsh operating environments where every second counts.

A list of possible applications:

  • Silicone spray is recommended by Safariland, Bianchi, and most quality holster manufacturers.
  • Safe for all holster types including Kydex, Leather, Nylon, and plastic.
  • Contains no oils, water, waxes or other harsh chemicals.
  • Protects firearm from abrasion, scuffing, corrosion, and rust.
  • It’s not only for holsters and can be used to protect knife blades, exterior surface of rifles, handguns and magazines.

I would like to give away a brand new unused bottle to one lucky person.
How to enter: Just leave a comment on this review.
How many entries per person: One entry per person.
Entry requirements: None other than leaving a real email address to only be used for contest winning notification.
Winner selected: December 20, 2015

What Defines A Quality Optic?

Why are quality optics important for gun owners? What’s the point in spending a hundred dollars, or even a thousand dollars, versus spending twenty five dollars, it’s just a scope right? No, not at all. Purchasing quality optics is important if you are planning to depend on your weapon for hunting, competition, or self-defense, or if you are just a plinker looking to avoid frustration. There are several different factors that are important to a quality optic.

This is a major factor when it comes to choosing any optic. A quality optic is able to withstand drops, falls, and tumbles and most importantly recoil. Cheap optics can literally be destroyed by the recoil of the weapons they are mounted on. For example a cheap red dot on a shotgun can be rattled apart by the heavy recoil. If you are looking to hunt with your optic remember to think about how your rifle rattles and bumps as it’s slung over your shoulder. Is your optic strong enough to withstand this?

If an optic cannot reliably hold zero what’s the point? When you place your crosshair, red dot, chevron, or whatever reticle you use on target and pull the trigger where does the bullet go? Shooting with a bad scope might as well be called patterning. Weak, cheap optics can lose zero due to recoil or bumps and jolts when handling the weapon. This can cause an unlimited amount of frustration on the range, but could be a major problem in a self-defense encounter.
Some scopes even go as far as incorporating built-in laser rangefinders and wind calls ( find out more about these systems in Burris Eliminator III review ) for extra precision.

When we actually get down to the heart and soul of a scope we have to look at the glass. This is important enough that plenty of people refer to any optic as simply glass. The glass is going to decide what kind of clarity you have when looking through the lens. At close range this is not a big deal, but when you extend your range, and up your magnification the level of clarity comes more into play. You’ll notice with subpar optics the image can easily blur and go in and out of focus. This could be a big deal when it comes to hunting and trying to determine if the animal you’re aiming at is legal to shoot or not.

A company that makes a quality product will proudly brand the item, and attempt to build a reputation on this brand. These brands are what often make an optic unique in both form and function. Typically a company producing a quality product will not attempt to steal thunder from another company. No clone has ever been as reliable as its original. If a company will proudly brand their item, and back it with a good warranty, you can typically assume it’s a good optic, and if it isn’t it’s backed by a real warranty.

Optics are investments. They are like firearms, they are not disposable and should last as long as your rifle. When you pay into a good rifle you are investing into a quality piece of gear that will return on your investment with deer slain, competitions won, and potentially lives saved.

This post has been published in co-operation with, written by Almo Gregor.

Safeguard Armor Ghost

I have had the privilege of testing out some body armor, specifically the Ghost model provided by Safeguard Armor. The model I was able to get some hands-on time with was rated Ballistic Level II and Edged Blade Level I.

Safeguard Armor Ghost

Safeguard Armor Ghost

I have to say that this is a really impressive piece of gear, and I do not say that lightly. Coming from someone who has no prior experience with a body armor like this, I had some expectations built up in my head from articles I’ve read and movies. The Ghost model by Safeguard Armor lived up to all of my expectations.

The image below is one of my favorites that I took from the review process. It features a 9mm round that was captured in the first layer of kevlar, both front and back images side by side.

Layer 1

Layer 1

Testing utilized a 9mm FNX handgun at distances from 10 yards to point-blank. The armor held up extremely well to the punishment. For example, the following image shows the aftermath of a shot that was fired point-blank with the muzzle of the pistol resting against the surface of the vest.

From left to right: the outer surface of the vest; inner surface of vest; kevlar layer penetration; intact kevlar on back.

Point Blank

Point Blank

The armor was very good at stopping rounds, with a success rate of greater than 71%. After multiple repeated hits in the same general area, the kevlar material would spread out a bit and thus let rounds through. But that is the nature of the material, and not a detractor against the product itself.

Have a look at the various state of rounds stopped by the armor:

Rounds Stopped

Rounds Stopped

With regards to the Edged Blade protection, I did not perform much testing other than attempting stabbing and slashing attacks. Neither were able to penetrate even the first layer of the kevlar material.

Wrapping Up
If you are in the need of affordable body armor I highly recommend the Ghost by Safeguard Armor as a solid, effective solution.

What Can Stop a Bullet? A Look at Popular Guns and Kevlar Vests

It is important to know exactly what your bullet proof vest can protect you against. You may already know how your favorite guns match up against targets or game, but how do they match up against Kevlar? All too often Kevlar is treated as truly bullet proof; a magic fabric which can protect against bullets. However, it can only protect against certain threats and even then only if it as at the appropriate level. Bullet proof vests are tested and graded according to international standards set by the US National Institute of Justice. These protection levels outline exactly what body armor can protect you against. Below are some of the most common, popular, and famous firearms, and an explanation of what is needed to protect against each.

Colt Python
The Colt Python was first made in 1955 by Colt, and is often referred to as a ‘combat magnum’. Colt stopped production in 1999, and the final release of the Python was in 2005. This revolver was originally favoured by law enforcement, with different variants used for different roles. However, the modern need for semi-automatic pistols meant it fell out of favour. To protect against the Colt Python you will need a Level II bullet proof vest.

Smith & Wesson 686
The Smith & Wesson 686 double action revolver was first introduced in 1980, and gained fame and popularity thanks to its adoption by the US Navy Special Operations. This revolver is popular for waterborne missions in particular because of its durability in the face of exposure to the elements, and it is easy to maintain compared to similar weapons. The Smith & Wesson 686 is also famed for its use by Luxembourg’s Grand Ducal Police. Protection against this weapon requires a vest at Level II.

Sig Sauer P226
The SIG Sauer P226 follows the same basic design of the SIG Sauer P220, but was developed to use higher capacity staggered-column magazines. It was originally conceived as a replacement to the M1911A1 used by the US Army, but it was eventually beaten by the Beretta 92F. However, the SIG Sauer P226 still gained fame thanks to its adoption by the Navy SEALs. A bullet proof vest at Level II is needed to protect against this weapon.

Ruger 10/22
The Ruger 10/22 is a semi-automatic rimfire rifle, designed as an ‘adult gun’ that could nevertheless provide easy handling. This, coupled with low recoil, made the Ruger 10/22 popular with young and inexperienced shooters, as well as being popular among small game hunters. It is also known for its compatibility with modifications, which are relatively easy to create and equip compared to other rifles. Protection from this rifle would require a Level II bullet proof vest.

Constructed to be extremely modular, the FN SCAR became incredibly popular thanks to its use by the US Military. It is available in two common variants; the SCAR-L for ‘light’ ammo (5.56x45mm NATO) and the SCAR-H for ‘heavy’ ammo (7.62x51mm NATO). The first rifles were issued in April 2009, and given to a battalion of the US 75th Ranger Regiment. However, US Special Ops Command would later drop the SCAR-L in favour of the SCAR-H, and plan on adopting conversion kits for the MK17 SCAR-H to enable their use of 5.56mm ammo. As of early 2015 the FN SCAR in various types was used by special ops/police in over 20 countries. The FN SCAR-L requires a Level III bullet proof vest, though only a Level IV vest can protect against the SCAR-H.

Named for the makers (Heckler & Koch), the HK416 is based on the AR-15 platform and was designed as an improvement on the M4 Carbine for the US army. This Automatic was made famous as the rifle used by the Navy Seals to kill Osama Bin Laden. The HK416 was adopted as the standard rifle of the Norwegian Armed Forces and is in official use by countries all over the world. This famous weapon uses a gas system which reduces malfunction and increases the longevity of its parts. A Level III bullet proof vest is necessary to protect against this weapon.

Designed in 1945, finished in 1946, and adopted by the Soviet Army in 1948. In 1949 it became the official weapon of the Soviet Armed Forces. The AK-47 is one of the most famous weapons in the world, and there is little that can be said about it that hasn’t already been said. The AK-47 is renowned for its reliability, accessibility, and its low production costs. The AK-47 is so popular that they make up approximately 15% of all firearms in the world. Protection against an AK-47 requires the highest level of protection at Level IV.

A US military adaptation of the AR-15, the M16 is another incredibly famous and popular rifle. The M16 was most famously used in Vietnam from 1963, and in 1969 the M16A1 replaced the M14 rifle to become the US military’s standard service rifle. In 1983, the USMC adopted it as their official weapon, and three years later the US army did the same. The M16 is the most produced firearm of its 5.56mm caliber, and total worldwide production of the rifle is approximately 8 million. The M16 was originally designed as part of an effort to replace the M1 Garand and other similar weapons, but also as a direct US competitor to the AK-47. Protecting against this famous weapon will require a vest at Level III.