About Aaron Spuler

Founder and Executive Editor for The Weapon Blog, Aaron is a firearms enthusiast and recreational shooter.

Carjacking Victim Turns Tables On Carjacker

A man held another man at gunpoint after he tried to rob him by getting into his passenger seat as soon as his doors unlocked after he parked.

The armed citizen, Hashim Fannin, says that the incident happened as soon as he pulled into the parking lot of a Family Dollar store.

The suspect, 61-year-old Edgar Horn, opened the passenger side door and sat down.

“He told me, ‘You know what this,’” Fannin said. Not waiting to see what happens next, that’s when Fannin says he pulled his gun out.

“I asked him to get out the car, probably not in those exact words,” Fannin said.

“I told him no, there’s no leaving, leaving was before you hopped into my car … at this point there is not leaving,” Fannin said.

Fannin kept the suspect on the ground and at gunpoint until police arrived.

Watch the video of the encounter:

If anyone knows how to get in touch with Mr. Fannin, please let me know. I want to get him a The Weapon Blog shirt and thank him for what he’s done.

Read more: http://concealednation.org/2015/05/raw-video-man-holds-carjacking-suspect-at-gunpoint-on-point-and-by-the-book/

The Art of The Hunt: What You Need to Know About Your Prey

Hunting is an art. It takes more than just wielding a bow or rifle to get a kill; you need a thorough knowledge of your prey and its behavioral patterns to be a successful hunter. Each individual animal has specific biological behaviors, and knowing what they are is a valuable hunting skill. Useful info and even training can be found on hunting course websites like huntercourse.com, but what behavioral information is useful to know about the specific game you’re hunting? Here is a list of the most popular game, their biological nuances, and tips on how to successfully hunt them.

Deer

Believe it or not, a whitetail deer has about 300 million scent detectors (as a reference, humans only use about five million scent detectors). You can manage scent control by using the wind to carry your scent — it is best to approach your hunting area with the wind in your face, so your scent is blown away from the location of your prey. Use odor-free products when it comes to your laundry detergent, body soap, shaving cream and shampoo. Companies such as Dead Down Wind manufacture fragrance-free products made specifically to keep your odor profile as low as possible. Avoid gas stations and alcohol before a hunt as well. There’s also a unit called the Ozonics generator that is easy to transport — about the size of a clock radio — and alters the odor of oxygen.

Rabbit

The easiest way to scout a rabbit is knowing its eating patterns. Identifying the environment you’re most likely to find a rabbit grazing is key; typically areas where there is tall grass, clover, broadleaf fields, soy, wheat, alfalfa and/or vegetable gardens. Rabbits feed in minimal light — at sunrise and sunset — which are the best times to go for the hunt. Rabbits will engage in their grazing period for about an hour — the first half is rapid grazing, followed by more selective eating. Rabbits have a large range of overhead vision and can easily notice nearby movement, so reducing your motion in the field will yield the greatest results.

Pheasant

Like rabbits, hunting pheasants is best during the eating period which falls in the early morning and at dusk. While they may roost in trees, pheasants feed on the ground and are often found in grasses or other light cover, looking for food (they are omnivores, with a diet consisting of mostly fruit, seeds and leaves, as well as insects, small snakes and lizards). To locate a pheasant nest, first identify the female’s wintering range, as the nesting site will generally be less than half a mile away. Nests are usually made among tall grass and vegetation on the ground. The female will create the nest in a hollow part of the ground that she scoops out herself, which will measure up to three inches deep. Being able to identify this nesting area is useful when locating the birds for the hunt.

Knowing the biological peculiarities of the game you’re hunting will give you a great advantage. This teaches you to anticipate the next likely move of your prey and always be one step ahead.

UPS Will Not Ship Suppressors

On a daily basis, United Parcel Service (UPS) delivers over 15 million packages to 6.1 million customers in more than 220 countries and territories around the world. It now appears that those packages will no longer include firearm suppressors. According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), UPS recently made the decision to stop shipping suppressors, even between licensees. As of yet, UPS has not given a reason for its abrupt change in policy.

“NSSF is working with UPS executives to determine what prompted the enforcement of this unwarranted policy. We are unaware of any thefts or losses that would explain the shipping company’s sudden decision to enforce a prohibition against shipment,” stated the NSSF in a press release.

UPS has not yet made an official announcement regarding the policy change, but appears to have modified the section of its website that describes its firearms policy to reflect that firearm “mufflers” and silencers will no longer be shipped by the company.

Read the rest of the article: http://www.outdoorhub.com/news/2015/05/18/ups-refuses-ship-suppressors/

Texas Open Carry Bill Sent To Senate Floor

A Senate committee on Monday approved an open-carry bill that had been stripped of a House amendment seeking to ban police stops to check for concealed handgun licenses.
House Bill 910 next goes to the full Senate for consideration.

The Senate voted along party lines two months ago to approve a similar bill.

Sen. Craig Estes, R-Wichita Falls, said the amendment was removed from HB 910 at the request of Sen. Joan Huffman, R-Houston, who is chairwoman of the State Affairs Committee. The committee held a public hearing before approving the bill Monday.

HB 910 had been amended on the House floor to bar police from stopping or detaining people with a holstered handgun solely to determine if they have the required concealed handgun license.

The amendment was added on the House floor last month by Rep. Harold Dutton, D-Houston, who said police have no business stopping citizens engaged in a legal activity.

“We don’t let the police stop every car just to figure out who does and who doesn’t have a driver’s license,” Dutton said. “I think the same principle applies here.”

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo and other critics have said the amendment would handcuff police in dealing with potentially dangerous situations.

Source: http://www.statesman.com/news/news/open-carry-bill-to-be-stripped-of-police-stop-amen/nmJYB/