About Aaron Spuler

Founder and Executive Editor for The Weapon Blog, Aaron is a firearms enthusiast and recreational shooter.

Bravo Concealment Torsion Holster Review

Some information from the manufacturer:
The Iconic Inside the WaistBand (IWB) Drop Out of Sight (DOS) gun holster is now better than ever! Our breakthrough Torsion Technology integrates a 10 degree inward angle which allows the gun holster to conceal your handgun better than any competitor’s holsters. The integrated inward angle allows your handgun to ride closer to your body without any extra attachments or accessories.

The Torsion IWB concealed carry gun holster is a dedicated IWB kydex holster. Whether you run appendix or anywhere else around your waist line this handmade kydex concealment holster is tough and built to last. The Torsion is easy to wear with our standard double IWB belt clip configuration. If you want more comfort and flexibility in your EDC positions simply remove the shorter belt clip and utilize a single belt clip for on-the-fly adjustments to your kydex appendix carry holster.

Running the holster in the “single belt clip configuration” allows for the holster to go “Tuck-able” This means that you can tuck your shirt between your pants and the holster for a more formal style of concealment.

  • Even Deeper Concealment with NEW Torsion Technology
  • Integrated 10 degree inward cant for greater conceal-ability
  • Designed specifically for IWB concealed carry
  • Virtually drops out of sight and erases your weapon’s visual signature
  • Comfortable to wear
  • One of few IWB holsters offering retention
  • Holster adds minimal mass to weapon
  • Holster retains its shape for efficient one handed re holstering

My thoughts:
I had the privilege to test both the IWB Torsion Holster and the BCA OWB Holster.

Please note that the only downside that I observed was the fact that at present these are available in right hand models only. Southpaws are left out at present, but left hand models are on the horizon soon.

As tested, these holsters for a Glock 19 retail at $44.99, which I find to be a very reasonable price.

Fit and finish are impeccable.

It is obvious that the folks at Bravo Concealment worked a long time to get the comfort factor just right, as it is very comfortable for all day (17 hour wear) without issue.

Final thought:
I would have no reservations in recommending the BCA holsters to anyone needing a holster for their firearm. Not only are the products outstanding, the company is a pleasure to interact and work with.

Retroactive Criminalization

The proposed ban on bump stocks not only applies to a wide, vague range of firearm accessories, as Christian Britschgi noted this morning. It also criminalizes mere possession of those accessories, making owners subject to fines and up to five years in prison, even if they acquired the newly prohibited items before the ban was enacted.

In that respect the bill, introduced by Reps. Carlos Curbelo (R-Fla.) and Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), differs from, say, the expired federal ban on so-called assault weapons, which did “not apply to the possession or transfer of any semiautomatic assault weapon otherwise lawfully possessed under Federal law on the date of the enactment of this subsection.” State “assault weapon” bans likewise allow continued possession of the targeted firearms, as long as owners register them with the government. Curbelo and Moulton’s bill, by contrast, says “this section and the amendments made by this section shall apply with respect to conduct engaged in after the 90-day period that begins with the date of the enactment of this Act.” That means continued possession after that point would be a federal felony.

Read the rest of the article: http://reason.com/blog/2017/10/11/bump-stock-ban-criminalizes-possession-o

Never Let A Good Crisis Go To Waste

House democrats have proposed bills in reaction to the Las Vegas murders:

  • HR.3962
    Banning online ammunition sales
  • H.R. 4025
    Requiring gun dealers to report the sale of two or more rifles to the same person in a five-day period
  • HR. 4052
    Banning magazines able to hold greater than 10 rounds

Chris over at Guns.com has the full details:

House Dems propose bills to stop online ammo sales, ban mags

Are Silenced Weapons Really That Quiet as Shown in the Movies?

Are Silenced Weapons Really That Quiet as Shown in the Movies?

Have you ever wondered about how people handle guns in the moves?

They make it look so easily!

Whether they are professional or act as if it were their first time shooting a gun, they seem to have no trouble with it except for a bit of shakiness (but this is all acting). But just like how they act, most of what you see on the television isn’t real. And one of the wrongly-perceived facts when using guns in the movies? How loud they sound!
Yes, what you hear and how people act when shooting a gun in the movies is NOT what you would expect in real life. But what is it supposed to sound like anyway?
Read on as I show you the facts about the gun’s sounds and the wrong perception between gun silencers and suppressors.

How Loud Are Guns?
So, let’s figure out where the gun sounds come from. The primary source comes from the sonic crack of the bullet, then the mechanical action and the sound of your bullet hitting your target.
Even the should as your bullet flies off the gun makes a sound! So with all these in mind, it isn’t exactly the silent sound you have heard in movies, nor is it just a crack. If used without protection or a suppressor, you may actually suffer from permanent ear damage because of it!
That is why people invest on silencers or suppressors, which reduces the noise to up to 43 decibels, which depends on factors such as the type of bullet and length of your gun’s barrel or silencer itself. On average, it would suppress about 30 decibels

Is It a Silencer or Suppressor? What People Get Wrong
No, it DEFINITELY isn’t a silencer! A silencer would make the sound of a gun fully quiet and simply just a “whoosh” sound, which you hear in movies. But silencers do not do that. In fact, they aren’t really called silencers, but are supposed to be known as its real name, which are suppressors.
They do not make the gun anywhere near silent, but suppress the noise because of the pressure wave from the propellant gases, which expands rapidly. So it only reduces a portion of what makes the gunshot defining.

Using a gun silencer is crucial because it would reduce the recoil to up to 30%, which would increase your accuracy and reduce your fatigue from miring. It also helps with its precision and your ear safety. You wouldn’t want permanent ear damage, and a suppressor, though still loud when used, will greatly reduce the risk.

How to Keep Your Ears Safe When Firing a Gun
So now that you know about the real sound of the gun and what to expect, what are the precautions you should make to prevent any injuries and perform well when using your gun?

It all boils down to the proper usage of guns, which takes practice and skill. You can never change the gun’s sound, despite having a suppressor. And since you can’t change that, what you can do is to adjust and get used to how it sounds.

But of course, while you are using it (unless it’s an unexpected emergency), ensure that you have the earplugs and protection to avoid affecting your ears. And as much as possible, invest in a suppressor because believe me, it isn’t just a “whoosh” sound you expect!

In Conclusion
When using a gun, there are things you must take note of. While you think that using a gun for the first time isn’t all that bad, it will take practice and skill to get used to handling it, especially when it comes to the sound! But as long as you have the proper protection for your gun and continue to practice with a suppressor, gaining knowledge on the gun, then you won’t need to worry about any injuries you may sustain while using the gun.

I hope that this article helped you become fully informed on the gun’s loudness levels and the importance of suppressors (they are not silencers!). So now that you’re acquainted with this area of the gun, do read more articles and learn more about its parts and function to further learn about how it works and how to use it.

If you have any questions or would like to share your tips and experiences on handling a gun and its sound, then comment down below. I would love to hear what you have to think.


Author Bio:Hi, my name is Naser, a gun enthusiast who’s always on the lookout for new and exciting weapons to use and gun accessories to improve my skills. As someone who’s had experience with handling a gun since I was a teen, I have the expertise and skills to share with you my ideas and tips on how to handle a gun properly and with style. So come join me as I share my passion!

Skill Set: Simple and Effective

There are no advanced skills. Responding to a threat is a matter of being able to apply the fundamentals. The techniques used should be simple to understand, easy to learn – with the appropriate investment – and easy to apply. For example moving, communicating with the threat – issuing verbal commands, using cover, and shooting if necessary. Don’t forget to be thinking too, figuring out how to best solve your problem. These concepts are fairly simple. For some reason though, a lot of people like to look for secret or magic techniques. They try to make it a lot more complicated than it really is.

With most things you have to figure out what you’re trying to do before you can determine how to do it. Take the basic fundamental of pressing the trigger as an example. To fire an accurate shot you press the trigger smoothly, without disrupting the sight picture or anticipating the recoil. Hold as steady as possible, press and let the shot fire whenever the firearm decides it’s time to fire. You’re looking for a “surprise” break on the trigger. This is simple to understand, but if you don’t grasp the concept you’ll never learn how to press the trigger properly.

You start applying this concept with the basics, firing one accurate round at a time. Try to go too fast – for example pushing to see how quick you can dump the whole magazine on target – and you’ll never master the basics of a good trigger press. When you get to the point you can always fire one good shot then start working on firing two accurate hits. Eventually you get to the point that no matter how many you fire, they are all accurate. The same principle applies to drawing the pistol, acquiring a proper grip and every other skill needed to use the pistol safely and efficiently.

A lot of times we’ll read about the techniques a professional/competition shooter uses. It may be a new or different way they’ve come up with to press the trigger. Just keep in mind these guys have been shooting a long time, with thousands of hours racked up on the range. Their job is to shoot. After that much time they have modified the basics, changing them in order to create the best performance they can produce. But, they all started with the fundamentals just like everyone else. Then, over time, their techniques evolved to fit them personally. Often times you’ll hear them say, “This is what works best for me.” This doesn’t mean it’s going to work for you. The only way to find out what works is to do it.

At some point you’ll begin modifying the way you do things. The way you acquire the grip on the pistol while still in the holster changes as you become more comfortable with drawing. You discover exactly where the support hand needs to be on the pistol. Over time the amount of pressure used to grip the pistol changes. This is good; you’re discovering what works best for you. Just don’t stray too far from the fundamental concepts.

Don’t be afraid to experiment. But keep in mind just because something is new or so and so does it doesn’t mean it’s better for you. When you change and then realize it’s not working go back to what you were doing before. Don’t try to force something to work. The techniques you use should be easy to understand, easy to learn, efficient and effective. Practice will make it all better.

This article originally appeared in the October 12, 2017 edition of The Tactical Wire (http://www.thetacticalwire.com/features/232097). That last paragraph is really a great one to take to heart.